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Times are changing this Autumn

Times are changing this Autumn 

This Autumn, we’ll be running an amended weekday timetable affecting Off-Peak* metro services, but only on days when we expect the weather to be at its worst.

The stations affected are below, and you can download the amended timetable that will run on those days to help you plan for the changes. We aim to give you 3 days’ notice before the amended timetable will be in place.

Check your journey up to 3 days in advance via our journey planner, National Rail, or the Southeastern On Track app. You can also follow us on Twitter for updates @SE_Railway #SEautumn 

If your station is affected, we’ll display a poster to let you know when the amended timetable is in place. 

 Albany Park   Maze Hill
 Belvedere  Mottingham
 Bexley  New Beckenham
 Chislehurst  Northfleet
 Clock House  Plumstead
 Deptford  Shortlands
 Dunton Green  St Johns
 Eden Park  Stone Crossing
 Elmstead Woods  Swanscombe
 Erith  Sydenham Hill
 Falconwood  Welling
 Kidbrooke  West Dulwich
 Knockholt  Westcombe Park
 Lee  Woolwich Dockyard

*The amended timetable affects Monday-Friday Off-Peak metro services towards London. Some morning Peak services leaving London towards these stations are also affected.

1. What is the short term amended timetable for autumn?

We have a Key Route Strategy for both autumn and winter, which is created in partnership with Network Rail, and includes a plan to minimise the effects of seasonal weather on punctuality. 

For autumn, part of the strategy means that on days when we expect the weather to be at its worst, our Off-Peak* metro services will call less frequently at some stations. These are short-term amended timetable changes and different to the usual timetable changes for autumn.

*The amended timetable affects Monday-Friday Off-Peak metro services towards London. Some morning Peak services leaving London are also affected. 

2. What stations does it apply to?

It applies to 28 mainly metro stations:

  • Albany Park
  • Belvedere
  • Bexley
  • Chislehurst
  • Clock House
  • Deptford
  • Dunton Green
  • Eden Park
  • Elmstead Woods
  • Erith
  • Falconwood
  • Kidbrooke
  • Knockholt
  • Lee
  • Maze Hill
  • Mottingham
  • New Beckenham
  • Northfleet
  • Plumstead
  • Shortlands
  • St Johns
  • Stone Crossing
  • Swanscombe
  • Sydenham Hill
  • Welling
  • West Dulwich
  • Westcombe Park
  • Woolwich Dockyard  

3. Why would it affect one station but not another?

The amended timetable has been produced in order to affect the fewest number of passengers, whilst enabling a significant increase in punctuality for passengers overall. 

4. Why do you implement it?

You wouldn’t think the humble leaf could cause so much trouble. 50 million leaves fall onto our train tracks every autumn. When mixed with rain and squashed by train wheels, they form a slippery layer on the rails like black ice.

Our drivers need more time to stop and start the trains as the wheels have less grip on the tracks. These timetable changes give us the extra time we need to drive the trains safely. 

5. How does Delay Repay work with it?

Delay Repay works as usual with the following exception: If you intended to catch a train from one of the affected stations which no longer stops there, and the next train you catch is delayed, Delay Repay will be calculated based on the train time of the service that you should have caught but couldn’t.

When submitting a Delay Repay claim, please make sure you enter the original planned train service. 

6. Under what conditions will you implement the short term amended timetable

We hold a weekly call with Network Rail in autumn to ensure that we can react to differing weather conditions. 50 million leaves fall onto our train tracks every autumn. When mixed with rain and squashed by train wheels, they form a slippery layer on the rails like black ice. Our drivers need more time to stop and start the trains as the wheels have less grip on the tracks.

On the weekly call, Network Rail advise us if weather is forecast to be particularly bad, and that we need to put in place the amended timetable for the next week. 

7. How much notice will passengers be given that it is to be implemented?

Because the timetable is put in place based on the weather forecast for the next week, we aim to give you 3 days’ notice. 

8. How will passengers be informed about it?

The timetables that will run on days when the weather is forecast to be particularly bad are on our website now, so you can plan for the changes.
We aim to give you 3 days’ advance notice that the amended timetable will be in place for the following week.

The stations that the amended timetable applies to will display a poster detailing the amended timetable for the week, departure screens on platforms will show the services that are running, and announcements will be made.

An alert will be sent out from National Rail Enquiries to subscribers of affected trains, advising of the changes.

Tweet us to find out about your service @Se_Railway #SEautumn

9. Why does the amended timetable remain in place when the forecasted conditions don’t materialise?

Because the short-term amended timetable is implemented for the following week, once plans are in place for this, and we’ve advised passengers and employees, we stick to the plan as this gives certainty to everyone about the timetable that will be in place. 

10. Why is it only Off-Peak / contra peak trains that are altered if the conditions are expected throughout the day?

We appreciate that if the changes apply to your journey then this will be inconvenient, but the amended timetable has been produced in order to affect the fewest number of passengers, whilst enabling a significant increase in punctuality of 8% for passengers overall. 

11. Why can we not run the normal timetable?

You wouldn’t think the humble leaf could cause so much trouble. 50 million leaves fall onto our train tracks every autumn. When mixed with rain and squashed by train wheels, they form a slippery layer on the rails like black ice. Our drivers need more time to stop and start the trains as the wheels have less grip on the tracks. Since implementing this short term amended timetable, we’ve increased the punctuality of our trains by 8% in autumn, versus previous years. 

12. Why do we run an amended timetable when other train companies who are affected by the same conditions don’t?

We make the decision based on the factors involved in running our particular train service in the South East. Different operators will have different factors involved which they will base their decision on. Some examples could be the gradient of the track, the number of trees lining the tracks, and how many trains need to fit on the section of track and keep to their timetabled schedule. 
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